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Two days after winning French Open, Nadal seen on crutches – and may yet need more treatment

The Spaniard is hopeful of completing the foot treatment in time to play at Wimbledon, which begins in June 27

Nadal with post-surgery crutches, Majorque Nadal with post-surgery crutches, Majorque © RTVE / Tennis Majors

On Sunday, Rafael Nadal wrapped up his 14th Roland-Garros title with a straight-sets win over Norway’s Casper Ruud. The win marked Nadal’s 22nd Grand Slam title, giving him an edge of two in the list for all-time Majors among the men (both Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic are tied at 20 each).

Two days later, Nadal began treatment on his injured foot – and although he is now back at home, he may yet need further appointments.

Tennis Majors understands that he travelled from Paris to Barcelona to see his doctor, Dr. Angel Ruiz-Cotorro, at the Clínica Mapfre de Medicina del Tenis.

There he underwent the treatment he mentioned in his post-tournament press conference – a pulsed radio frequency treatment, numbing the nerves in the foot on a temporary basis.

He has since been seen on crutches after the first session of the treatment, and will return to full practice if it proves successful.

Nadal was snapped getting out of a car in Barcelona where he could be seen on crutches with a bandage on his left foot. The Spaniard did manage to sign some autographs for fans who were waiting for him.

After winning in Paris, Nadal had said he would undergo treatment on his foot and was hopeful to play Wimbledon, which begins in less than three weeks now.

The Spaniard had used injections to numb his injured foot, along with anti-inflammatories and painkillers, which enabled him to play through seven matches in Paris, including wins over four top 10 players.

But the Spaniard said he would not play Wimbledon in similar circumstances and would only play in London if his treatment enabled him to compete without taking injections through the tournament.

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