Subscribe to our newsletter

“I need to improve the mental part”: Rublev aims for mental toughness to rise further

After winning his 10th career title, Andrey Rublev admitted that he needs to become mentally tougher in order to break through to the next level

Russia's Andrey Rublev celebrates with the trophy after winning the Dubai Tennis Championships final match against Czech Republic's Jiri Vesely Russia’s Andrey Rublev celebrates with the trophy after winning the Dubai Tennis Championships final match against Czech Republic’s Jiri Vesely Image Credit: AI / Reuters / Panoramic

Andrey Rublev is a 10-time titlist on the ATP Tour and a Grand Slam quarter-finalist many times over. On Saturday, the 24-year-old won his second tournament in as many weeks, beating Czech qualifier Jiri Vesely 6-3, 6-4 to win the ATP 500 Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships.

The title comes on the back of his triumph in singles & doubles in Marseille last week and extends his winning streak to nine matches. But for all the success he has enjoyed on the ATP Tour, Rublev is aware that needs to step up on the bigger stages – the Grand Slams and the ATP Masters Series level.

“At least in my opinion, that’s exactly what’s stopping me for the next step to be a better player, to show better results, is (the) mental part.”

Rublev is still searching for his first Grand Slam semi-final (four-time quarter-finalist at the Majors) and his first ATP Masters Series titles (two runner-up finishes).

When asked if he was ready to transfer the same success to the Grand Slams and Masters Series, Rublev maintained that he needs to find the right balance when he goes deeper into the bigger events.

“Of course everything, I can transfer this to the majors. The problem is that sometimes I want something really badly and I cannot manage this emotionally so I need to find a balance to be more stable mentally, to be better mentally. I think it will come also that I will have chances to go deep in a Masters or Grand Slams. Even last year I did two finals of the Masters. I had I don’t know how many quarterfinals (in) the Grand Slams. I had a chance to be in the semis. But like I said, I didn’t manage it mentally and that’s why I couldn’t win that matches.”

“I think it’s all about myself. If I want to improve mentally, if I’m ready and I will be strong enough, I will do it.

The Russian, who said he would sleep in for at least two days to get over the exhaustion of his efforts oevr the past two weeks, said in the end it boils down to himself to take the next step.

“I think it’s all about myself. If I want to improve mentally, if I’m ready and I will be strong enough or hard on myself, I will do it. I think mental part is not about coach. It’s about you. If you want to change some things inside of you, you’re the one who take responsibility. Doesn’t matter who you will take on your team, you can take the best 10 or 20 specialist, they will tell you all the same things. If you don’t want, you will not change these things. It’s not about someone. There is no secret about mental part and how to improve. Everybody told these things a thousand times. All the best athletes on histories, all the best philosophies, all of them, they say that many times. It’s about you.”

Your comments

Your email address will not be published.