Subscribe to our newsletter

‘People still don’t understand how to make me lose’ – Medvedev riles Madrid crowd, fired by spirit of 2019 US Open

Daniil Medvedev had plenty to say on the court of the Caja Magica following his Davis Cup singles win over Jan-Lennard Struff, which secured the Russian Tennis Federation a spot in the final. Asked to reflect on his tournament so far, amidst a huge amount of heckling and whistling from the Spanish fans, the world … Continued

Daniil Medvedev Tennis – Davis Cup Semi Finals – La Caja Magica, Madrid, Spain – December 4, 2021 Russian Tennis Federation’s Daniil Medvedev celebrates after winning his semi final singles match against Germany’s Jan-Lennard Struff (Panoramic)

Daniil Medvedev had plenty to say on the court of the Caja Magica following his Davis Cup singles win over Jan-Lennard Struff, which secured the Russian Tennis Federation a spot in the final.

Asked to reflect on his tournament so far, amidst a huge amount of heckling and whistling from the Spanish fans, the world No 2 announced: “Beating Spain was the highlight.”

He added: “It started in 2019 [at the US Open], but I’m not going to be tired to say it – people still don’t understand how to make me lose. They should support me.

“It’s OK, guys,” he said, addressing the noisy fans. “Continue. I’m going to just win.”

Medvedev: It’s a game I don’t play on purpose

In his press conference later, Medvedev was asked about his celebration that he directed at the crowd.

“If I celebrate I like to do something fun. In our team, especially what is funny is Spanish coach likes to say this in Russian. He doesn’t know a lot of Russian words. Coach of Karen. He knows how to say, Calm down. When we play cards or play tennis or football or anything, when somebody wins, he’s like, Calm down, calm down.

“When Cristiano played in Madrid, he was doing this celebration a lot of times. That’s why I decided to do it. I felt it was fun. But, yeah, probably it was the wrong decision, which can happen. Yeah, I had to go with it and to stick with it because I like to stick to what I do.”

He admitted, though, that some of his on-court antics might not be the best idea.

“It’s a game which I don’t play on purpose. Everything I do, especially on the court even more than in life, is pure emotions. In life I’m more calm. When you ask a question, you guys, I have time to think, ‘Okay, what do I think? What should I answer? It’s the same with any other person in real life.On tennis court, it’s different. It’s a lot of adrenaline going on. I hate to lose. There is less time and less power in myself to stop and think. So I go with emotions which sometimes is good, sometimes is not good.”

Your comments

Your email address will not be published.



This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.